Our neighborhood is constantly changing. Here you can find out about some of the larger planning projects that are currently in the pipeline.

Jacques land use redesignation

In October 2012, the City of Calgary received an Outline Plan/Land Use Amendment Application to re-designate (rezone) and subdivide a 13 acre property known as “Jacques Site/or Jacques Lodge,” located North of Bow Trail, between single detached homes to the east and west. The site is owned by the Metropolitan Calgary Foundation and operated by Silvera for Seniors, a non-profit seniors housing organization that provides subsidized housing to lower income seniors throughout the city.

Currently there are approximately 55 single family units adjacent to the site. The plan calls for 890 new residential units, with a total projected population of approximately 1,165 people, up to 165,000 square feet of commercial, office and seniors support space, and to up to 400 employees arriving at the site each day.  In total, redevelopment of the Jacques site would contemplate up to 1 million square feet of commercial, retail and residential use.

The rezoning was approved after almost two years of working with city planners, in an expanded role which allowed them to add some transparency around the sufficiency of the plan. Last minute concessions from Silvera regarding planned set-backs for existing homes were sufficient to allow Shaganappi community board members to speak in favour of the plan at the July public hearing. The density proposed is unchanged, but focussed more appropriately to the middle of the site.

If you are a resident adjacent, the zoning on the Jacques property adjacent to your houses is M-C2, which is medium density multi-residential, with varied building height and front setback areas that are intended to reflect the context of your houses. The MC-2  zone will be extend at least 50 metres from the property line across the lane at 26th Street, and at least 80 metres from the property line at the west side of 24th Street.  Between these two M-C2 setback areas, 36 metre heights are possible in the middle of the site.

On the east and west sides of the property, building heights next to existing housing will be capped at 10 meters for 25 meters from the Jacques property line into the site (24 meters if you live on 26 Street); after which there will be a 16 meter limit total to the end of the MC-2 parcel. Jacques site buildings will need to be set back 8 meters from Bow Trail, 6 meters from the Jacques property line in the lane of 26th Street and 3 metres elsewhere on the property.

The Shaganappi ARP has some additional protections for residents adjacent to Jacques; a senior’s designation for the area in the middle of the site, a requirement for “exceptional signature architectural design” for any tall buildings at that location and landscaping requirements for the site more generally.

Also, if you are a resident of 26th Street adjacent, the November passage of the Shaganappi ARP allows for rezoning of your property to full M-C2 with a 16 metre height limit, from the previous R-C2, which restricted development to infills and duplexes to a 10 metre limit.

We do not yet fully understand the impact of rezoning at Jacques on the sale and development of the land, and the details of what will be built. However, we are hopeful that the viability of the project can be better justified by an experienced developer with specific plans at the development permit stage. Specifically, we would like to see plans to resolve significant traffic challenges and fully understand the implications of the planned re-configuration of the Sovereign Crescent hill.

Shaganappi Point Area Redevelopment Plan

The passage of the Shaganappi Point Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP) in November 2014 will allow rezoning to either M-CG or M-C2 with a 16 metre height limit, from the previous R-2, which restricted development to infills and duplexes to a 10 metre limit along the entire 12thAvenue corridor on the South side of Bow Trail. These are medium density multi-residential designations, with varied building height and front setback areas that are intended to reflect the context of existing houses.

If you live north of 14th Avenue and west of 24thStreet to 31st Street, this will impact you.  If your block runs north/south, the impact will be on approximately 1/5 of the north end of your block (roughly 35 meters, or the depth of one lot). If you reside on 13th Avenue, the entire north side of your street can be rezoned to these designations, but to a lower height limit of 12 metres, as compared to the previous 10 metre limit. Heights on 25A north of 14th Avenue are also limited to the lower 12 metre limit at the north 1/5 of the block, with 10 metre heights being retained for the balance of the block.

If you reside on 26 Street north of Bow Trail, or south of Bow Trail for approximately 1/5 of the north end of the block, the ARP provides for multi-residential to the full 16 metre height and to 12 metres for the balance of the block to 14th Avenue.

The Shaganappi Point ARP was initiated in response to a community request for a context to deal with development pressures on 12thAvenue in 2012. A consultant’s report was initiated by city planners for the perimeter along Bow Trail and this report was subsequently combined with the Jacques application to create the broader ARP.  The ARP was circulated to the community and discussed at broadly advertised town halls and open houses. Shaganappi community board members spoke in favour of the plan at the November council meeting.

Despite refusal by the Calgary Planning Commission, the Shaganappi Point ARP proceeded to Council for approval twice, in September and again in November.  At the December meeting, there was a very animated debate between density advocates and more pragmatic forces on council. The pragmatists carried the day, and Shaganappi has a workable medium density development context for the community. It may not be perfect, but in light of very strong idealistic views of a popular mayor, and the dissenting views of CPC, this was a very good outcome.

Westbrook Village Area Redevelopment Plan

The Westbrook Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP) was approved by council in June 2009, and provides a detailed policy framework for implementation of high-density transit oriented development within an approximate 53 acre area bounded by 32ndStreet to the east, 39th Street to the west, Bow Trail and 17thAvenue. The plan is intended to be implemented over the next 20 – 30 years, depending on the market absorption rate. This development will replace the current automobile oriented shopping centres and former Ernest Manning school site over the next 30 years.

If you are a resident within the Westbrook Village ARP area, that is, on the west side of 32nd Street and the east side of 33rdStreet, you are zoned M-C2, which is medium density multi-residential, with varied building height and front setback areas that are intended to reflect the context of your houses. Once again, this allows for a 16 metre height limit along 33rd, with a lower 14 metre limit along the west side of 32nd Street. The east side of 32ndStreet reverts to R-C2 zoning with a 10 metre limit.

In response to a request by Matco Investments Ltd., the purchaser of approximately 13 acres of land at the former Ernest Manning school site adjacent to 17th Avenue and 33rd Street, certain amendments to setbacks and the road configuration were considered and approved by council in the same November council meeting. The ARP allows for up to 2.3 million square feet of commercial, retail and residential use at the Matco site.